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13 Mar

Your “great” idea? Great only if you can communicate its value

Copyright 2017 Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster, No More Boring Meetings, and Creator of Mixing Chamber TM You and your team surely have game-changing ideas. But what if you don’t know how to effectively communicate their value so others will take notice—and take action? Individual business leaders and entire organizations are undoubtedly leaving money and opportunity on the table without realizing it. That’s because most professionals don’t understand how to package their best ideas. They don’t know how to communicate their value in ways that audiences want to hear. Plus, most meetings aren’t designed to make the most of the collective intelligence in the room. The sad result? The very best ideas may go unnoticed or unfunded. But a powerful force is disrupting how presentations are delivered and consumed. That force is TED Talks. Their global prevalence and popularity have shown us a new way to communicate spreadable, viral-worthy ideas. The TED Talk phenomenon has critical implications for those who want to share their ideas. It forces organizations and their leaders to drastically improve presentation skills to stand out in a sea of sameness. To communicate their best ideas quickly and effectively. To drive more innovation and revenue within an organization….

05 Jan

What if attendees remember nothing from your meetings?

Andrea Driessen is Chief Boredom Buster for No More Boring Meetings in Seattle, Washington. © Andrea Driessen 2017 Given the amount of time we spend surrounded by computers—at work, at home, during commutes and yes, in meetings—it’s natural to think we humans are a lot like Pentium chips. We believe we can keep adding data and everything will be automatically saved on the “hard drives” in our heads. If only. While the human brain is indeed powerful, it is not capable of remembering—much less recalling—all we try to cram into it. The meetings world is particularly vulnerable to this overload. Let’s take a closer look at what happens to our minds in meetings, explore how to boost recall and memory, and in the process, the impact of all our events. Most meetings are often overloaded with so much material that learning may be hurt more than it’s enhanced. In fact, attendees may not remember anything from our meetings. What do you remember from the last meeting you attended? If you recall only one element of this article, may it be this: Less is more. As Jeff Hurt, EVP of education and engagement at conference consultancy Velvet Chainsaw, explains: “Forgetting is…

26 Sep

The Perpetual Vacation: How to Extend Your Holiday All Year

Did your summer vacation seem too short? This post will help you extend it. Immediately. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster Travel — the epic, transformational kind that involves passports, airports, disconnecting from the Matrix, good socks and an open mind — is deeply compelling for most of us. Journeying expands our thinking, generates meaningful friendships and — if you’re Eat, Pray, Love author Elizabeth Gilbert — can lead to a bestseller, a blockbuster movie and a marriage. After a long-anticipated trip to Ireland to celebrate reaching my half life (age 50), I recently had plenty of time to think on the long ride home about what made the trip so special. And realized, with relief and surprise, that the joys and journeys of travel don’t have to involve visas and liquids in Ziplocs. Travel, adventure and being present enough to uncover the unexpected, can happen right down the street from home — when I pack the right attitude, enough curiosity and some resourcefulness. I can (intentionally!) leave my cell phone behind, stroll just a few blocks, walk into my Seattle neighborhood’s Irish pub order a Guinness, enjoy some live music…and simply chat up those around me rather than…

13 Sep

5 Ways to Maximize Investments in all your Meeting Presenters

By Andrea Driessen Whether you invite external keynoters, subject matter experts, breakout session presenters or a combination of these speakers to your meetings, you invest a great deal of time, effort and money to involve others in delivering actionable content. And with over 2.7 million people worldwide watching TED talks every day, audiences everywhere have come to expect speakers to be exceptionally compelling, engaging and memorable. So how can you make the most of all speakers’ time and talent? Five easy ways: SCHEDULE A MESSAGE CONTINUITY CONFERENCE CALL This one phone call can take your meetings from mediocre to memorable. How it works: invite to a conference call all your meeting-message stakeholders who play significant roles in sharing expertise. Your goals are to air and then reinforce the most important “meta-message” take aways for your audience. Invariably—in the simple act of conversation—otherwise unknown themes and patterns emerge. Connections and common ground are found that boost each speaker’s impact. This call also ensures that any content redundancies and contradictions are revealed and removed in advance, so you can make the most of every minute. Trying to convey too many messages can mean very little sticks. Often, we communicate more—and more is remembered—when…

21 Jul

The client conference call: what consultants, trainers & thought leaders may be doing wrong–and how to fix it

Synopsis: How are we perceived by listeners—say, our clients—on the other end of conference calls? How do we show up and make impressions—indelible first impressions—on those who make our livings possible? In my work, I participate in countless speaker-client calls, and this post is born from that experience. >>>>>> If you’re a consultant, trainer, or thought leader who schedules conference calls to strategize live events or meetings with larger audiences, you well know the importance of delivering content from your clients’ points of view. What you may not fully appreciate is that customers are listening long before you step into the larger spotlight—during preparatory conference calls. As the owner of a speaking agency for nearly two decades, I often participate in calls between clients and speakers. Why take the time? Because these conversations offer a treasure trove of back-door R&D. And they provide crucial windows through which I learn more about client culture, needs, team dynamics, and pain points. I listen for both what’s at stake at the pending meeting—and for future needs. As a result, I have a front-row seat to these client-speaker exchanges. And I gotta tell you: too many miss the opportunity to shine here, on the…