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30 Dec

Why Event Sponsorships Should Never be about Sponsors

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster Budgets are top of mind this time of year, so let’s focus on how to make yours go further. The TED brand and its range of live and virtual events have taken the world by storm. As a TED-head who’s a student and practitioner of TED-branded events, I’ll focus here on what my TED experiences teach us about designing sponsor experiences through a decidedly different lens. I’m deeply involved with audience experience design, speaker curation and sponsor (AKA partner) acquisition for a large TEDx Event, TEDxSeattle (previously TEDxRainier). And I attended TEDActive (the event that happens concurrently with TED) in British Columbia. This collective experience has opened my eyes to the power of turning the tables on how sponsors are courted and integrated into an event’s design. Just as the most successful meetings are much less about speakers on stage and much more about participants in the audience, effectively curated and nurtured sponsorships should be ever-so-much-less about the sponsors and oh-so-much-more about the potential customers they want to engage. So if your events or tradeshows rely on sponsors, you can drastically improve both how meeting goers engage with sponsors and improve the results the…

02 Dec

Why Meetings Should be More Like The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon

By Heather Pelletier, Engagement Unlimited, Vancouver, BC, © 2015 First let me openly confess…I love Jimmy Fallon. I want to be his friend. Who doesn’t? He’s the best! Over two years ago, Fallon took over The Tonight Show (AKA Late Night) and what a difference! The picture below is a great example of this transformation. THE TONIGHT SHOW STARRING JIMMY FALLON — Episode 0062 — Pictured: (l-r) Actress Charlize Theron, announcer Steve Higgins, host Jimmy Fallon and actor Josh Hartnett play charades on May 20, 2014 — (Photo by: Douglas Gorenstein/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images) A Justin-Jimmy duet was just the beginning. The show has been viewed over 2 billion times on YouTube, and has had a 41% ratings increase in the ages 18-49 demographic. What has changed? Musical comedy interwoven throughout Game Playing Incorporation of technology A skilled host. Fallon has created a new formula for success in late night TV. It includes showcasing guests’ talents, integrating social media, not taking himself too seriously, trying new things, and most importantly having lots of fun. My TV bestie is not just talented—he’s also playful, positive, charming, witty, and makes others around him feel relaxed so they can just be…

10 Nov

How boredom kills us—in body, mind and spirit—and what to do about it

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster A podcast on the tedium of boredom produced by Public Radio International delves into the subject of boredom in a decidedly un-boring, substantial way. Let’s explore the piece, along with related compelling research, to see how being “bored to death” isn’t just a euphemism. And discuss what to do about it. How boredom can destroy us: • It’s easy to think of boredom as a lack of stress and stimulation. Yet in a study at the University of Waterloo, researchers showed that boredom is actually a state of stress — levels of cortisol (the stress hormone) in fact rose after boredom was induced. (Who knew?!) • We sometimes use the expression “I’m bored to death,” whether in a meeting or not. It’s meant to be an overstatement, but in 2010, researchers at University College London studied questionnaires completed by 7,524 civil servants in the late 1980s who were between the ages of 35 to 55. Those who noted higher degrees of boredom were more likely to have died upon a follow-up than those who had not reported feeling bored. • Furthermore, boredom is damaging to our integrity — it crushes our souls as we…

26 Oct

When “Perfect” isn’t Perfect

Guest Blog by No More Boring Meetings’ Speaker-Partner Allison Clarke. Are you willing to engage in an experiment with me? It might seem silly, yet I promise there’s a purpose. I’ve been noticing lately how everyone uses the word PERFECT. For instance, when I ordered a drink at Starbucks, the cashier replied, “perfect.” After confirming my reservation at a hotel, the front desk said, “perfect.” When my friend and I set a meeting date for coffee, she celebrated with a “perfect!” Why is this such a hot and overused word? I bet that if you counted how many times you heard it, it could be well over 25 times per day. Now, there’s certainly nothing harmful or wrong with this word. I’m simply questioning if it’s the most appropriate choice. When I looked up the definition of perfect, it said: having all the required or desirable elements, qualities, or characteristics; as good as it is possible to be. Hmm, are we really as good as we can possibly be? Does any situation have ALL the desirable elements? Are we projecting a sense of perfection onto each other? I’m a big fan of being positive, as you know, but the word…

03 Aug

Take one (or more) for the team: 5 group activities that build trust, commitment & accountability

        By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster, copyright 2018 No More Boring Meetings In his bestseller, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, author Patrick Lencioni describes five primary reasons teams fail. (To which some will say, only half-jokingly, “What, only five!?”) Using these dysfunctions as a framework, I’ll profile corresponding teambuilding exercises to turn that dysfunction into engaging, purposeful function. 1. Absence of Trust We know trust is the cornerstone of solid teams. Ropes courses are classic, often-used and perhaps now-tired ways to instill team trust. Want something fresh—and essentially free? Workshop leader Scott Crabtree uses a simple, powerful and fast method. He invites members of low-trust teams to present personal pecha kucha (the Japanese phrase for chatter) slide shows about their lives outside of work, so people connect as individuals. Ten image-only slides get just 10 seconds’ of one’s personal life story. Says Scott: “Keeping the presentations short preserves engagement and interest, and ensures everyone gets a turn. More than that, in this simple act of revealing our non-work selves, trust and vulnerability are built as we learn more about each other in 10 minutes than some do in 10 years.” 2. Fear of Conflict If…