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03 Aug

Take one (or more) for the team: 5 group activities that build trust, commitment & accountability

        By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster, copyright 2018 No More Boring Meetings In his bestseller, The Five Dysfunctions of a Team, author Patrick Lencioni describes five primary reasons teams fail. (To which some will say, only half-jokingly, “What, only five!?”) Using these dysfunctions as a framework, I’ll profile corresponding teambuilding exercises to turn that dysfunction into engaging, purposeful function. 1. Absence of Trust We know trust is the cornerstone of solid teams. Ropes courses are classic, often-used and perhaps now-tired ways to instill team trust. Want something fresh—and essentially free? Workshop leader Scott Crabtree uses a simple, powerful and fast method. He invites members of low-trust teams to present personal pecha kucha (the Japanese phrase for chatter) slide shows about their lives outside of work, so people connect as individuals. Ten image-only slides get just 10 seconds’ of one’s personal life story. Says Scott: “Keeping the presentations short preserves engagement and interest, and ensures everyone gets a turn. More than that, in this simple act of revealing our non-work selves, trust and vulnerability are built as we learn more about each other in 10 minutes than some do in 10 years.” 2. Fear of Conflict If…

08 Jun

Effective speakers shouldn’t do this, right?

        Have you noticed a strange trend in our speech patterns? It’s a common verbal tick that’s simply annoying in social settings, yet reputation diluting in professional settings. You’ve likely heard and unwittingly participated in this meme: YOU: “This work party is rad—open bar and everything!” YOUR COLLEAGUE: “I know, right?” It’s meant to be an innocent, fun-loving way to express agreement. And that’s fine in informal conversations. Yet I believe “I know, right?” has the same effect as “uptalk,” that annoying but common habit of raising our voices at the end of declarative sentences, making us sound unsure of ourselves. Linguists define it as “A speech pattern in which phrases and sentences habitually end with a rising sound, as if the statement were a question. Also known as upspeak or high-rising terminal (HRT).”  As in: “I am sure we’ll find a way to refrain from uptalking,” ending with a rising voice that turns a statement into a question and a confident person into an unsure one. I’ve been hearing the “I know, right?” along with the stand-alone, end-of-sentence, equally offending “…right?” pattern not just in “rad” social settings but—more alarmingly—in company training programs, on demo reels…

30 Apr

Top 10 Tips for Team Meetings: Boost Productivity & Professionalism

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster at No More Boring Meetings A version of this piece first appeared in the American City Business Journals London School of Economics and Harvard University researchers report that business leaders spend 60% of their time in meetings, and only 15% of their time working alone. As a busy professional, with the majority of your work time spent in groups, you can learn 10 easy ways to host and contribute to more productive team meetings: Be a know it all It’s natural to disengage when meeting content isn’t relevant. The most effective meeting hosts review all potential agenda segments to determine whether they apply to all attendees. If participants already know a particular content slice, then simply don’t cover that segment for the broader audience. Or if you have vastly different levels of awareness in the room, divide people accordingly to ensure maximum relevance for all. No problem? No meeting! We often meet habitually: the weekly project check-in, the monthly mandated. Yet many of these less-then-productive meetings can be canceled or shortened if we identify the problem the meeting is intended to solve. And if we can find no identifiable problem, then we don’t have…

23 Mar

The UN-Fam Fam: How a “Discovery Tour” goes beyond showing off a property to educate and inspire

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster As a meeting planner, you well know the value of seeing a meeting venue in person before contracting space. Yet with so much on your plate, can you really justify being out of the office for a day or more to visit on a fam (familiarization) tour? And as virtual reality tools begin to make visiting from our desks just about as real as visiting in person, I believe the fam tour must evolve. To stay ahead of the curve, the team at Suncadia Resort near Seattle decided to elevate the experience of the traditional “fam” tour and turn it into a content-driven, experiential Discovery Tour. –> Or what we can call the Unfam Fam. Sure, everyone had the chance to walk the luscious grounds, tour the meeting and sleeping rooms, dine on deliciousness and savor a short spa treatment. Additionally, planners gained insights on designing more productive, less-boring, and more active meetings that address the whole person: body, mind and spirit. They interacted with content and co-created ideas for staging more effective events in meeting spaces of the quality and scope offered by a location like Suncadia. That’s in part because the Suncadia…

11 Feb

3 games to make meetings more efficient and effective

We all know meetings can be extremely boring. After all, if you’re strictly relying on internal speakers to carry the weight of your meeting, some will be more effective than others at disseminating information effectively to meeting participants. Games, however, can improve meetings drastically, do much of the work and catch everyone’s attention. Games are fun, exciting, and give an element of surprise to meetings that make employees engaged and creative. Entertainment site Pocket Fruity mentions that smartphone apps like Draw Something and Words with Friends became huge hits particularly because they’re games that make everyday activities such as scribbling and writing words extremely fun. If you’re going to be a speaker in next meeting, here are a few ideas to make your audience more responsive. Trading Cards This game is very effective in introducing new employees to each other. If you’re an HR officer and part of your job is to make people comfortable with each other, introduce the Trading Cards game. It’s very simple. Just give each employee a piece of paper and make them create their own “player card” that includes their alias, hobbies, and unique traits of themselves. Once that’s done, ask them to pass the…