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23 Jan

5 Meeting Time Wasters—and What to do About Them

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster Meetings can become boring when attendees feel their time is disrespected and their contributions are underappreciated. Let’s look at five most common ways meetings suck our time—and what to do instead. 1.     Meetings without end goals. How do you know when you’re finished with your meeting, if you haven’t set a goal for it in the first place?  Meetings are often scheduled out of habit or obligation—not because there is a pressing problem to solve as a group. Further, meetings in which little or no progress is felt can seem to drone on with no end in sight. Instead, before and during the gathering, give your audience a clear picture of where you’re headed, and what your meeting is accomplishing. For example, post a meeting check list, with clear milestones. And as time goes on, visually and audibly show that you have in fact reached these hurdles. Even small wins, accompanied by public acknowledgement (a tangible reward, an audible ping, a loud bell), can—in the language of a good video game—move your meeting forward, and your organization to a higher level of teamwork and productivity. 2.     The wrong people at the table. Take time…

05 Dec

2 More Strategies to Fund Event Games via Sponsorship

(Part 2 of 2. Click here for Part I) With all the buzz about integrating games into events, you may thinking YES! Let’s get a meeting app with a game to engage our attendees. And in the same breath: um, how do we pay for it? 1.     From cost- to profit-center Allowing current event sponsors—and/or new ones—to get in the game by sponsoring your digital or non-digital game is a smart way to help fund the experience. Moreover, with the right strategy, a game can go from a cost- to a profit-center. How? By approaching the right sponsors with the right opportunity at the right time, you ensure attendees play an engaging, business-objective-based game that also achieves brand awareness for sponsors. Most clients of CrowdCompass make many times more in sponsorship revenue than they invest in the cost of the app, and these apps consistently cost less than printing event programs, according to their director of marketing, Matthew Donegan-Ryan. Mountain Travel Symposium, with support from QuickMobile, integrated sponsorship into their game, which included a gallery tool. To share personal experiences at the conference, participants took photos and earned points to exchange for gamer-only discounts at sponsored stores and restaurants near…

03 Dec

3 Effective Strategies to Fund Event Games via Sponsorship

Start small, win big By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster With all the buzz about integrating games into events, you may thinking YES! Let’s get a meeting app with a game to engage our attendees. And in the same breath: um, how do we pay for it? Know this: when you play your cards right, your game-ful app can become a popular engagement tool; a printing-, paper- and money-saving conference program; and, indeed, even a profit center. But to win at this game, note these five important rules to heed first. 1.     Start with the end in mind You set yourself up for success with your game when you make thoughtful decisions based first on your audience—not on what you and/or your sponsors think is best, warns Trevor Roald, mobile technology evangelist with Vancouver, BC-based QuickMobile. As a planning tool, Roald and his team use the Forrester-recommended POST (People, Objectives, Strategy, Technology) strategy. Originally created for marketing and biz-dev professionals, POST is now being used in mobile application development. POST ensures you put the people (not the tech) first, and build your objectives and strategies around them. What incents your attendee: Competition? Collaboration? Sustainability? The answer will inspire the game’s…

19 Nov

What to Do About Self-Absorbed Meeting Attendees (pay attention to them, among other things)

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster You could stage the best meeting the world has ever seen. But if no one knows, or not enough of the “right” people attend, all your efforts are for naught. We tend to view meeting engagement as something that happens once everyone convenes. And yet for a meeting to be a true success, we must see engagement as an integrated process that starts when you first reach out to potential attendees with initial, registration-boosting messages. The most effective strategy? I like to rely on an old-school marketing technique: setting my communication dial to “What’s In It For Me,” AKA WII-FM on a radio (or iPod!) tuner. Applying this to the meetings realm: What’s In It for prospective attendees to invest time and money in your event?  People engage with what matters to them based on their own self-interest. Nothing more—and nothing less. You could stage the best meeting the world has ever seen. But if no one knows, or not enough of the “right” people attend, all your efforts are for naught. Sound obvious? Not so fast. Turn away from this blog for a moment—and read your latest event marketing content. Examine the approaches…

14 Nov

4 Top Meeting Trends: YOU Figure Prominently

By Andrea Driessen, Chief Boredom Buster When you think about the future of meetings, what word or emotion comes to mind? I, for one, am energized. In fact, that’s the first of four trends I see on the meeting horizon: Energized. Brain science and meeting design are finally catching up with each other. In short: we learn less when we sit, more when we move. The meme in social media: “Sitting is the new smoking.” Yet most meeting rooms (and classrooms) are designed for sedentary meeting attendees, not active participants. This is changing, as we learn that exercise brings more blood flow to the hippocampus, leading to more brain cell growth. When we move our bodies, our brains move new information from short- to long-term memory, and we absorb more in less time. Another reason to move while you think: the body produces more protein as a result of exercise, which doesn’t just build muscle. Movement is also thought to produce new cell growth as our brains get more of what they need to function effectively. Wish I’d had known that when cramming in college—hitting the gym each day  sure beats trying to sit still for hours in the library!…